dcurtis

sexpigeon:

Theoretically there was some time when this would have been the last thing I saw before I fell asleep. Would have considered the flaws in the brickwork, maybe even counted them. Would have considered bricks I actively like and ones I would like to see replaced. Would have come to hate that busted bullshit of a keystone. But of course now I fall asleep with my phone on my face, so the last thing I see is the sum of human knowledge, and not a disused brick chimney.

sexpigeon:

Theoretically there was some time when this would have been the last thing I saw before I fell asleep. Would have considered the flaws in the brickwork, maybe even counted them. Would have considered bricks I actively like and ones I would like to see replaced. Would have come to hate that busted bullshit of a keystone. But of course now I fall asleep with my phone on my face, so the last thing I see is the sum of human knowledge, and not a disused brick chimney.

46 Notes

Hi-Five! Hi-Five?

I have discovered the solution to the constant awkwardness of the unknown handshake/hi-five/slap and hug intent. Be the first to put your hand out.

Life lessons, man.

3 Notes

Hannahmight: so fucking tired

hannahmight:

of people being like “I wrote this comedic [screenplay/pilot]” and then you check their twitter and it’s all boring self-promote-y links and 0% jokes and no one is actually funny and everyone is super boring but it doesn’t even matter because of course success has nothing to do with anything. And…

13 Notes

Anthony Bourdain (via howtowork)

"When I wrote Kitchen Confidential my business model was, “I Don’t Give a Shit,” and I’m trying very hard to keep that as my operating business model. I never, ever think, what will they like, what do they expect, what should I do next. The business model is to not be full of shit, that’s about as much as I can hope for from myself, and to write something that’s entertaining to me and presumably to others like me."

61 Notes

Dark Social: We Have the Whole History of the Web Wrong
Alexis C. Madrigal, theatlantic.com

Here’s a pock­et his­to­ry of the web, accord­ing to many peo­ple. In the early days, the web was just pages of infor­ma­tion linked to each other. Then along came web crawlers that helped you find what you want­ed among all that infor­ma­tion. So…

Dark Social: We Have the Whole History of the Web Wrong
Alexis C. Madrigal, theatlantic.com
Here’s a pock­et his­to­ry of the web, accord­ing to many peo­ple. In the early days, the web was just pages of infor­ma­tion linked to each other. Then along came web crawlers that helped you find what you want­ed among all that infor­ma­tion. So…

1 Notes

Joshua Longbrake: Theory Have you ever seen the show Shameless? The British series, not...

joshualongbrake:

Theory

Have you ever seen the show Shameless? The British series, not the American one. Shameless is hard to watch and is it ever holy. Right? When art throws truth right in your gut, the first reaction is retraction. Too true! Too true! I cannot endure it. A quick summary:

Single dad, a real…

10 Notes

In which Pussy Riot signifigantly contributes to the literature of resistance

0 Notes

Double Robotics’ telepresence robot gives your iPad legs
By Nate Ralph, theverge.com

Dou­ble Robot­ics’ Dou­ble wants to get your iPad out of the house and into the office, or class­room, or fac­to­ry floor —any­where, real­ly. The $2,499 telep­res­ence robot uses a pair of iPads: one sits in the self-balancing base, the other ser…

These will be worse than dodging tourists.

Double Robotics’ telepresence robot gives your iPad legs
By Nate Ralph, theverge.com
Dou­ble Robot­ics’ Dou­ble wants to get your iPad out of the house and into the office, or class­room, or fac­to­ry floor —any­where, real­ly. The $2,499 telep­res­ence robot uses a pair of iPads: one sits in the self-balancing base, the other ser…

These will be worse than dodging tourists.

0 Notes

from The Fall of the Creative Class (via thefollowingisforreferenceonly)

(via thefollowingisforreferenceonly)

"

I know now that this was [Richard] Florida’s true genius: He took our anx­i­ety about place and turned it into a prod­uct. He found a way to cap­i­tal­ize on our nag­ging sense that there is always some­where out there more cre­ative, more fun, more diverse, more gay, and just plain bet­ter than the one where we hap­pen to be.

But I’ve been down that road, and I know where it goes. I know that it leads both every­where and nowhere. I know you could go down it for­ever and never quite arrive. And I know now that it may be wiser to try to cre­ate the place you want to live, rather than to keep try­ing to find it.

"

2 Notes

(Source: somethingchanged)

28 Notes

NASA control room during touchdown of Curiosity

trevornp15, youtube.com

Humans doing a human thing at the human level.

0 Notes

"Be joyful, though you have considered all the facts"

The daily podcast from The Writer’s Almanac

0 Notes

But did it do the Ickey Shuffle?

0 Notes

The Tools Make the Rules

0 Notes

Louis CK interview excerpt

AVC: In a conversation with fans on Reddit, you wrote that one of the last jobs you had before becoming a comedian was covering football games for local cable-access. That seems like, on one hand, terrible and an incredibly tedious gig, but on the other hand really useful in terms of learning how to put something together.

LCK: Totally. Really useful. Yeah. Covering football games—

AVC: How do you get a job like that?

LCK: Well, I was technical director of a cable station, so I had to do everything. But you get it by going to a local-access cable station—I don’t know if they still have those. But I was a volunteer intern, and I was in high school. And I learned how to use every machine in that place. My biggest advice to people would be key on the technical. If you learn how to use these machines—cameras and editing systems and stuff like that—then you will have the tools to do stuff creatively. There’s some people who turn up their nose to the technical side of production. It’s the dumbest thing that people do, because then you need to get permission and crews to shoot for you. But I learned how to fix the fucking cameras at this local-access cable station. I knew how to do everything. So I could be trusted with the equipment. That’s really all it ever comes down to, is insurance. They can’t fucking give you the equipment unless there’s somebody qualified to run it. And I learned how to do this stuff when I was 16 years old. So out of high school, I worked at a cable station, and I covered the football games. And so I had to drive this little remote van with a switcher in it and cameras and three big, fucking heavy cases. And there’d be, like, three volunteers with me. Had to drag these cameras up to vantage points around the football field, and the clock is ticking and people are showing up for the game, and start placing the cameras, register the cameras—which is a really weird technical process with tiny screwdrivers—plug them into the van, fucking fire up the van, get all the shots right, punch in all the fucking names of the players and their numbers, and get ready, and here comes the game. It’s a lot of pressure. Yeah, huge training ground. Great benefit.

AVC: One of the things that’s interesting and unusual about your career, especially for a comedian, is that you’re deeply interested and invested in the business, technical, and artistic elements of everything you do, not just the creative side. 

LCK: Well, it’s all so interesting. It’s all so goddamn interesting. It really is. I love knowing why I was able to sell out in one town, and why I wasn’t in another town. I love knowing what goes into everything—the economics, the technical aspect, and how to create the ideas in the show. It’s great. If you can have access to all of that, why the fuck would you not want to know? I just love learning. I think learning is how you live. The verb of my life is learning.

http://www.avclub.com/articles/louis-ck-on-eating-pressure-and-providing-an-alter,82102/

1 Notes